FIRSTNAME AND TRAY : NO INFLUENCE ON THE RESULT




Name your child Madeleine, Como or Irene will not be sufficient to guarantee him a “Very good” in the tray in 18 years. But if he works diligently, he could find many namesakes to his side at the table of honor, according to a sociologist’s names.

According to the observations of Baptiste Coulmont, a researcher at the CNRS and a specialist of the sociology of first names, more than 25% of the Madeleine, Irene, Como and Ariane who have passed the bachelor 2012, received a “very good”. More of a Mary-Anne, Anne-Claire and Gaspard on five also.

In addition, these names are associated with relatively few failures in the tray, only 3% of the Madeleine in front of, for example, take the oral catch-up, note Baptiste Coulmont on his blog (http://coulmont.com/blog/). “There is of course no direct relationship between a name and success in the bac”, warns the researcher of the University of Paris 8 (Vincennes-Saint-Denis).

Not determinism, not between first and last name and intellectual capabilities : “if the children of professors, teachers and doctors were called Pumpkin and Potironne, then Pumpkin and Potironne would receive a lot of notices”, he says.

If relationship there is, it is indirect and closely related to the social environment of the parents. In this case, Madeleine, Como and Irene reflected, therefore, the majority of first names in vogue among the upper classes, and the executives here are about 18 years old.

For their part, workers and employees have over the past thirty years tend to prefer names to sounding “anglo-saxon” or reflecting their possible foreign origin. In fact, we observe in the census, which is not exhaustive, conducted by the sociologist, that none of the 125 Youssef or 105 Nabil has not received mention in “TB” and that more than 30% of them are in the situation to take the oral catch-up. In the same way in 2012, “only one or two Sandy, Alison or Sofiane drop the reference to TB. 4 Christopher (out of 300) and 5 Mohamed (on 400). 8 Cassandra and 8 Sabrina the 470,” said Baptiste Coulmont.

And beware, if you call today your daughter “Madeleine”, it will not get in 18 or 19 years old, a “very good” with an equal chance to Madeleine, who were 18 years of age in 2012, he insists.

Because according to the researcher, “the world of names evolves each year,” and the Madeleine today is not the day before yesterday.

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